LUISA GUERREIRO

'Momo'

Momo - 2014
(Filament Theatre) Polka Theatre, Stratford Circus, Greenwich Theatre, London

The Stage (14/03/2014) - Susan Elkin

There are some fine performances, especially from the impassioned but shy Marvin, diminutive but feisty Guerreiro and Adabayo Bolaji.

www.ayoungertheatre.com (16/03/2014) - Jemma Anderson

Luisa Guerreiro’s Momo is a loveable character, full of heart and empathy for her fellow characters...Momo is a strong adaptation full of true moral and heart, designed to keep children in a fantasy world for an afternoon

www.everything-theatre.co.uk (03/04/2014) - Lauren Zimmerman

Guerreiro sings with a beautiful, pure voice... the music is beautiful and expertly sung. The way the performers stay on pitch without instrumentation is hugely impressive.


'NewsRevue'

NewsRevue - 2013
Canal Cafe Theatre, London

Remotegoat (08/09/2013) - Laura Kressly

The cast is high energy and skilfully manoeuvre around the small stage at a rapid pace...The cast complimented each other very well and were well balanced. The ensemble work was terrific, with no one overshadowing or lagging behind in ability or presence. Comic timing and physicality was excellent and fully committed. The actors’ performances were faultless.


'Mother Teresa?'

My Mama Monologues - 2012
Akaku Maui Television Centre, Maui, Hawaii

Pat Masumoto - Writer and Producer (01/03/2012) - www.mymamamonologues.com

Luisa Guerreiro was on Maui recently, where she had just filmed a comedy sketch for our island audience...I challenged Luisa to tell us about her mama. She literally seized the moment and began a hilarious series of short tales with such improvisational wit, my friends and I screamed with laughter.

I was able to capture her the next day to film a monologue she composed, “Mother Teresa?”. It will be included in our 2012 Mother’s Day production of international stories. The piece was ideal, full of sardonic wit and displaying her aptitude for accents. Not only is she a natural talent, she was delightful to work with. Despite her diminutive stature, she filled the recording studio with large energy. She was receptive to direction and acted on them in a professional manner. Her expressions were fresh and filled with physically observable comedy, yet with moments of poignant reflection.


Hare and Tortoise

Hare and Tortoise - 2011-2012
York Theatre Royal / The Lyric Hammersmith / Sheffield Crucible

The Stage (29/09/2011) - Kevin Berry

Tortoise is colourful - a Mediterranean tortoise with an accent to match. Luisa Guerreiro plays her with a wonderfully open face. When she wakes from her winter slumber there is surprise and delight in her eyes...There is superbly observed movement from the two characters...They will remember Guerreiro climbing steadily onto a platform - just like a tortoise. Young audiences matter and they matter now. They deserve the very best and here they get it.


The Guardian (03/11/2011) - Lyn Gardner

the real pleasure here is not the message...but the touchingly drawn friendship between Barnaby Southgate's gangly, overexcitable Hare and Luisa Guerreiro's careful and methodical Tortoise. It's an odd couple relationship that pays gentle comic dividends.

The York Press (28/09/2011) - Charles Hutchinson

What is certain is that children and accompanying adults will love this enchanting show. It is pretty on the eye, visually witty too, with dialogue that is playful and meaningful, plus humorous and more serious songs and incidental music by Dom Sales to suit Hare and Tortoise alike. Best of all, Southgate and Guerreiro are a terrific double act.

What's On Stage (29/09/2011) - Ron Simpson

Luisa Guerreiro's comically expressive face manages to conjure up a decidedly tortoisy look at times.

The British Theatre Guide (29/09/2011) - Mark Smith

Guerreiro has a superbly expressive face which yawns and stretches with each new interjection.

The Star (19/12/2011) - Rob Hollingworth

Thanks to the comic timing of Luisa Guerreiro, the Tortoise and the talent of the Hare, Barnaby Southgate, both parents and children were given a treat.

Dr Seuss' The Cat in the Hat

Dr Seuss' The Cat in the Hat - 2009-2010
The National Theatre / The Young Vic Theatre, London

The Times (18/12/2009) - Dominic Maxwell

It's a triumph...Thing One and Thing Two are let out of their box to run around like DayGlo Oompa Loompas flying kites on wires and rods

Daily Express (18/12/2009) - Paul Callan

Things One and Two (played by lively twins Luisa and Sandra Guerreiro) keep the laughter going. Both have beautifully animated faces

Independent on Sunday (20/12/2009) - Kate Bassett

two mad imps with electrified blue hair, create gleeful chaos

Mail on Sunday (27/12/2009) - Georgina Brown

Thing One and Thing Two, embody the spirit of anarchy that children (from four to 94) find both irresistible and terrifying

Sunday Times (27/12/2009) - Samantha Thackray

the suspense, [which] was doubled - or rather trebbled - with the arrival of Thing One and Thing Two, who moved so fast, it was hard to keep up with the mayhem

Guardian.co.uk (17/02/2011) - Sophie Nield

the fabulous Luisa and Sandra Guerreiro

The Tragedy of Macbeth

The Tragedy of Macbeth - 2011
The Scoop, London / Charlton House

Remotegoat (28/04/2011) - Sheila Cornelius

(Luisa resembles) a sturdy troll in shorts...it's the weird sisters, and they don't come much weirder, who make the play memorable...Played with gusto by Michelle Yim, Alicia Bennett and the superb Luisa Guerreiro

Don't Let The Pigeon Drive The Bus!

Don't Let The Pigeon Drive The Bus! - 2007
The Pleasance Dome, Edinburgh

British Theatre Guide (12/08/2007) - David Chadderton

Guerreiro, wearing a foam pigeon costume that looks very much like the book's illustrations, is absolutely superb as she dashes about in frustration trying to persuade the audience to let her drive the bus. She also appears most comfortable when dealing with unpredictable responses from the very young audience.

Edfestmag.co.uk (14/08/2007) - Imogen Thomas

Children and adults alike can't help but adore this mischievous yet lovable pigeon as (he) shuffles around the stage trying to trick the bus driver into letting him take the wheel. With upbeat songs and a set comprised of large, spongy cubes, children squeal with delight every time the pigeon enters the scene and involves them in the action.